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PD Resources - Books Related To Education Philosophy

The Whole Movement of Life is Learning

The Whole Movement of Life is Learning

This new collection of J Krishnamurti's Letters to the Schools combines the letters originally published in Volume I (1981) and Volume II (1985) with seventeen previously unpublished letters from earlier years. The letters from Volume I, numbered 1 to 37 in this edition, were dated fortnightly between 1st September 1978 and 1st March 1980. The letters from Volume II, numbered from 38 to 55, were dated as follows: four monthly in November and December 1981 and January and February 1982, ten fortnightly from 1st October 1982 to 15th February 1983, and four fortnightly in October and November 1983

On Education

On Education

This book is the outcome of talks and discussions held in India by J. Krishnamurti with the students and teachers of schools at Rishi Valley School in Andhra Pradesh and Rajghat School at Varanasi. These centres are run by the Krishnamurti Foundation India, which was set up to create a milieu where the teachings of Krishnamurti could be communicated to the child. Krishnamurti regards education as of prime significance in the communication of that which is central to the transformation of the human mind and the creation of a new culture. Such a fundamental transformation takes place when the child, while being trained in various skills and disciplines, is also given the capacity to be awake to the processes of his own thinking, feeling and action. This alertness makes him self-critical and observant and thus establishes an integrity of perception, discrimination and action, crucial to the maturing within him of a right relationship to man, to nature and to the tools man creates.

Democracy and Education

Democracy and Education

Dewey always said that his 1916 Democracy and Education was the fullest statement of his philosophy, although many have ignored this claim. One of the major stumbling blocks in reading Dewey is his appropriation of terms that mean something very specific to him, such as democracy, experience, growth, philosophy, and education. In using these terms, he leaves behind all of the classical dualisms between the self and society, mind and subject matter, theory and practice, and others. (For instance, society educates selves and selves constitute and can modify societal practices). The key to democracy is education (which is much more than just schooling) that promotes criticism, self-education, and constant growth. Philosophy, in the broadest sense, is criticism. Since life is best lived as growth (the unexamined life is not worth living), and democracy is the best way to deal with the constant changes that all societies face, an education that helps children love learning and change is essential to a democratic society. Unfortunately, many societal constructs are educative in a narrow sense, and allow us to be complacently self-satisfied and rigid in our habits (ie we become fundamentalists). Dewey warns against the business mind that, since the writing of this book, has thoroughly permeated many institutions, including the university.

What Did You Ask At School Today?

What Did You Ask At School Today?

This is a beautiful work, extremely well written, almost an encyclopaedia for those interested in children's education.' - Dr Yash Pal, National Research Professor

This insightful and well-researched book is for teachers and educators, as well as anyone interacting closely with children. Applying frontline research in child psychology, the author calls for a dramatic change in approach towards school teaching. The skill of being able to ask the 'right questions' is far more important than giving the right answers, says Mukunda, and urges teachers to adopt good teaching practices and an open mind towards the learning process of a child.

Using a step-by-step approach, and giving varied examples from school situations around the world, the book unravels interesting questions on learning, memory, intelligence, child development and emotional health. This is an enlightening read for parents, social workers, psychologists and counsellors.

How Children Learn

How Children Learn

This enduring classic of educational thought offers teachers and parents deep, original insight into the nature of early learning. John Holt was the first to make clear that, for small children, "learning is as natural as breathing." In this delightful yet profound book, he looks at how we learn to talk, to read, to count, and to reason, and how we can nurture and encourage these natural abilities in our children."

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