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PD Resources - Books Related To Professional Development

Lesson Study Step by Step

Lesson Study Step by Step

"At a time when so many educational policies fail to recognize and nurture the capacity of teachers to improve instruction, we feel enormously grateful for the learning community lesson study has brought to us." -Catherine Lewis and Jacqueline HurdIt's a simple idea: if we want to improve instruction, what could be more obvious than collaborating with fellow teachers to plan instruction and examine its impact on students? Lesson Study empowers teachers to improve instruction. Unlike one-size-fits-all professional development, Lesson Study allows teachers to bring their own pressing needs to the table. They seek out answers from one another, from outside specialists and research, and from careful study of students during lessons that incorporate teachers' collective knowledge. The result is a shared vision of good instruction.Lesson Study Step-By-Step shows new groups of teachers how to begin this journey, and experienced teams how to to deepen their work. It provides guidance through each step of the Lesson Study process, from building a group and homing in on a topic to conducting and reflecting on a research lesson. Strategies and materials are provided to support you each step of the way, including:

(1) A schedule for the overall process.(2) Sample meeting agendas.(3) Protocols for observation and discussion of lessons.(4) Templates for development of the research theme and teaching-learning plan.(5) Suggested processes for norm-setting and effective group management.

See Me After Class

See Me After Class

Teaching is hard work. Lessons go wrong. Parents get angry. And, sometimes, a teacher would rather eat glass than spend another day trying to manage a classroom. These are the days they don't tell you about in teacher training. Enter: See Me After Class.This survival guide helps every teacher walk into their classroom day-after-day with clarity, confidence...and sanity! Fueled by hundreds of hilarious stories and practical tips from the teachers who lived them, Elden offers honest advice and reassurance to help teachers inspire and educate generations of students. The author has made in clear from the start that this book is not Chicken Soup for Teachers or a Professional Development/Pegagogy manual, but rather, in a humorous fashion, a realistic insight into the trials and tribulations of being a teacher. It seeks to unmask the fact that teachers, as in other jobs, can face bad days, and commonly too. This is evident from the many stories shared by other teachers which should strike a familiar chord to both budding and veteran teachers alike

The Teaching Gap

The Teaching Gap

Wiggins and McTighe present in their second edition of Understanding by Design ways to improve the understanding of students through designing courses around specific well-¬‐articulated goals.During points of the book, the authors take time to explore the meaning of several key words, such as "understanding," "assessment "and "curriculum, "in order to fit with their purpose and suggestions.This is a book that has become the standard for course design in secondary and higher education over the past eight years, and is worth exploring.Overall, the book provides various templates and strategies for designing lessons in a Backwards design. Wiggins and McTighe suggest beginning with what you want the students to have learned at the end of the lesson. The initial chapters focus on terminology like "understanding" and "assessment," with the book turning to methods and questions to form lessons in the later chapters. The authors present a user-­‐friendly account of a learner-­‐centered approach. Don't you just love it when a book comes along that validates everything you've been thinking about your job for the last twenty years? That's exactly how I felt when I read The Teaching Gap by Stigler and Hiebert. These authors set out to discover the difference in teaching methods between eighth grade math classes in Japan, Germany, and the USA. They analyzed hundreds of videotapes of actual classrooms in those countries and discovered something they termed a "gap" in the effectiveness of teaching methods between the USA and the other two countries. Then, unexpectedly, through researching the background of this gap, they found models for instituting change in educational systems. It's this discovery that most likely led to their publishing a book for a popular audience rather than a simple volume mostly of interest to fellow pedagogues.I heartily applaud them in this. I don't think I'm the only elementary school teacher (as opposed to politicians, administrators, or anyone else in a position to actually effect change in the school system) who has a good idea of where the solutions to our problems lie, but the problem is in articulating them. That's where this book can come in very very handy. Not only does it express what many of us have known for years, but it's also been written by University people, so those in a position to affect change might actually listen to them.

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